Bad Weave

The rise of Bad Weave in the hair industry

 

The global hair extension market was worth US$2 billion in 2017 ($2.76 billion). It’s predicted to hit US$7 billion by 2028.  The majority of the world’s wigs, wefts and extensions begin life as discarded waste product — hair swept from temple floors, salon floors, dead body, picked from combs and salvaged from plugholes.”Premium” hair is supposed to be different — but with no industry oversight and shadowy Chinese supply chains, there’s little way consumers can know what they’re getting until it’s too late.

The most coveted grade of hair is “virgin Remy” — unprocessed (“virgin”) hair that has been kept in a ponytail (“Remy”).

“Remy hair, where the cuticle layers are all facing the same direction from root to end, ensures the hair extension behaves exactly like your own hair.

Price doesn’t always guarantee quality. Many “virgin remy” bundles are really just a combination of hair from salon floors or drains, mixed with synthetics and other non-human fibers.

Hair extensions sellers are reliant on their brokers or wholesale suppliers for information and most have no idea where the hair originated.

“It’s tough to find someone who goes directly to the source, like Malaysia Hair Imports To cover themselves, some sellers waive responsibility.

As most company terms, “we do not warrant that the quality of any products purchased by you will meet your expectations.”

In the USA, there are no laws requiring imported human hair to be certified or a duty paid. “Some countries in the EU require human hair to be fumigated.

Just as few consumers and hair business is able to distinguish good hair from bad, even fewer are aware of the realities of the hair industry.

 

 

 

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